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Hillsborough - The Ongoing Fight

Discussion in 'General LFC Discussion' started by liamo3, Mar 30, 2009.

  1. redabbey

    redabbey
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    BBC4 screened an excellent three part documentary on the CPS last year. I was very impressed by the thoroughness that they showed in each criminal investigation in the series. The charge they decide/or not too against anyone has got to be one that they believe they can get a conviction on.

    The charge against Duckenfield is a very serious charge and one that I understand is very hard to prosecute. It carries a maximum sentence of life.

    Last year I was at Professor Scraton's book launch in Belfast. The figures he quoted for the amount of people involved in this investigation and the costs were staggering. He was also very confident that this day would come. It is of course just another starting point on the road to justice but a very significant day.

     
  2. Auldkopite

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    See that SWFC plc have 'wriggled out' of any corporate responsibility by changing the company name. All wrong that, shouldn't have been allowed.....bastards.
     
    #1262 Auldkopite, Jul 1, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2017
  3. Auldkopite

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    One of the defendants charges - quote at end :

    '(As a common law offence this carries a maximum penalty of imprisonment for life)'

    Good.
     
  4. bobby benitez

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    Martin Thompson

    Sunday 2 July 2017 00.04 BSTLast modified on Sunday 2 July 201709.01 BST

    Last Tuesday night, as I was getting into bed I was thinking about the decision of the Crown Prosecution Service to charge six people in connection with the Hillsborough disaster. I thought about those people waiting on the decision whose lives were about to be turned upside down and the anxiety they were feeling.

    I have had many sleepless nights over the years because of Hillsborough. During the inquests, the night before I was to give evidence I had woken up crying – the tears streaming down my face. I couldn’t even remember what I had been dreaming about. I just sat in bed crying.

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    Had any of these people ever thought about me or the other families over the past 28 years? Had they ever wondered what it was like for a 19-year-old to phone his mother to tell her that her youngest son was not coming home from a football match? Was the anxiety they were feeling close to mine before I had to identify my brother?

    I thought back to the inquest. I had seen these men. When I looked at them, they weren’t the men I remembered from 1989. The uniforms. The way they stood on the Leppings Lane terrace with Margaret Thatcher the day after – talking to her, giving her their story. By the time of the inquest, they were old and their arrogance was taken apart by far superior minds from our legal team.

    After many hours of questioning by Rajeev Menon, QC, David Duckenfield, who was the match commander for South Yorkshire police on the day, slumped – and I saw a weak man. Just a man, and yet this man had changed my life.

    Back in 1989, I couldn’t escape Hillsborough. Everywhere I turned it was there in the faces of the people I knew and loved. The media at the time had taken the side of the police and we – the fans and families – were treated with disdain. I had had enough and decided to leave the country and travel. The Jewish community in Liverpool had planted a tree for everyone that had died at Hillsborough in the peace forest just outside Jerusalem. So I made it my goal to spend the first anniversary if I could in the forest.

    Hillsborough Independent Panel report was the first real victory, then the inquest verdicts of unlawful killing, and now, 28 years after I last saw my younger brother, there will be people facing criminal charges for their part in the disaster.

    Many more would have been charged if we had had the justice we deserved all those years ago. Six people doesn’t seem a lot when you realise how many people were involved in the smears and cover-up that went on after 15 April, 1989, but that’s where we are – and you can’t help but think back through the years about the people who never lived to see this day.

    As I lie in my bed and think of the years of sleepless nights and the tears I have shed over Hillsborough, I know I will sleep soundly. There are six people whose lives will change forever, and they’re welcome to the anxiety and sleepless nights to come.

    Stuart Thompson died at Hillsborough at the age of 17
     
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  5. Auldkopite

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    Read that in the Observer......so sad and ironic. Absolutely right about only six being charged - should have been many more. Hope you do get some sleep now Martin.
     
  6. redabbey

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  7. LKDAVE

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    http://www.derryjournal.com/news/hillsborough-disaster-documentary-in-derry-1-8232189

    A man who investigated the Hillsborough disaster will be in Derry this week as a key documentary on the tragedy is screened in the city. ‘Hillsborough’, the film documenting the disaster at the Sheffield Wednesday football ground during the FA cup semi-final match between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest back in 1989, will be shown this Wednesday and Thursday night. The screenings will take place in the Craft Hub at Rosemount Factory starting, at 7pm each night. The film will be followed by a question and answer panel discussion with Professor Phil Scraton, primary author of the Hillsborough Independent Panel’s Report, and factual consultant to the film. There will also be a book signing of the new edition of Professor Scraton’s definitive book, ‘Hillsborough: The Truth’. A total of 96 people died, while hundreds were injured and thousands left traumatised as a result of the football ground tragedy. A spokesperson for the organisers of the events in Derry said: “Beginning on the fateful day in 1989, Hillsborough explores the key developments in the preceding years, months, weeks, days, hours and minutes leading to the horrific loss of life. “It tells the story of the families’ resilience in their quest for justice, the eventual findings of the Hillsborough Independent Panel that exonerated the fans and demonstrated the culpability of the police and other powerful institutions.

    “It concludes with the inquest verdicts and the families’ responses. “The film was made for ESPN and the BBC and directed by Dan Gordon. It was screened to great acclaim around the world but could not be shown in Britain or Ireland while the recent inquests were in session. “It was shortlisted for an EMMY after it was shown on BBC2 following the momentous verdict of unlawful killing at the Hillsborough inquests. Public reaction was unprecedented and this year it won a BAFTA for best factual documentary.” Informed by over two decades of research by Queens Professor Phil Scraton, the film uses original footage of the disaster and its aftermath, interspersed with harrowing first-hand accounts by the bereaved, survivors and police officers.

    It shines a light on institutionalised injustices and media-fed myths that prevailed for a quarter of a century. The Hillsborough families have been long-term visitors to events in Derry around the Bloody Sunday weekends and have supported the Derry families in the quest for justice as well. Craft is the arts and cultural group in the Outerwest area of Rosemount, the Glen and Ballymagroarty and Hazelbank. It offers venue space and programmes for arts, music, drama, dance, video and recording. Tickets can be booked through the Glenview Community Centre, telephone 02871267748 or email: sineadbarr@gmail.com

    Read more at: http://www.derryjournal.com/news/hillsborough-disaster-documentary-in-derry-1-8232189
     
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  8. redabbey

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    The PCC said the officer who made the application for funding had already received financial support worth approximately £7.6m, relating to legal costs incurred during a private prosecution and the Hillsborough Inquests, which concluded in 2016.
     
  9. Gerry

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    I could not find the Anne Williams thread

    Nice to see the survivor's being thought of

     
  10. Niall

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    Joe Thomas

    · 11:00, 15 JAN 2018

    · Updated12:31, 15 JAN 2018

    Anne Williams’ heroic fight to establish how her teenage son died at Hillsborough is to become the subject of a new TV drama.

    The inspirational mum’s efforts will be turned into a four part series after ITV commissioned the project.

    Ms Williams, from Formby, remained a prominent figure in the campaign for justice up to her death in 2013.

    The mum-of-three was left devastated by the death of her 15-year-old son, Kevin, who was caught up in the tragedy on the Leppings Lane terraces.

    Alongside other families of the 96 Liverpool fans who died in the disaster, survivors and campaigners she fought bravely to challenge the results of the initial inquests and question the events of April 15, 1989.

    Since her death at the age of 62, her daughter Sara has continued her fight.


    Award winning programme makers World Productions are set to produce the series detailing her life after being commissioned by ITV.

    The project is to be written by author and producer Kevin Sampson, who will base the drama around the book With Hope In Her Heart, written by Anne’s daughter Sara and ECHO journalist Dan Kay.

    Sara said: “This is something I have thought very carefully about before deciding to go ahead.

    “Mum’s story is such a powerful and inspiring one, and we all remember how important she always felt it was to get the message out there and bang the drum for justice.


    Verdict of unlawful killing of the 96 Hillsborough victims at the Inquest in Warrington. Families come out of court. Sara Williams outside court


    “There have been a number of expressions of interest in dramatising the book over the last four years, but the key factor here is the involvement of people who I know personally and who also have a deep understanding of Hillsborough, our story and all the elements around that.

    “I am excited, as well as a little bit scared, but I just feel it is the right thing to do and am looking forward to working alongside talented people who I know will give everything to ensure we produce a series that does justice to my mum, our Kev, the 96 and everyone involved.”


    Anne Williams with a picture of her son Kevin, who was unlawfully killed at Hillsborough when he was 15

    Sampson, who was at the 1989 semi-final as a fan, added: “It’s fitting that ITV will tell Anne’s story. From Jimmy McGovern’s original drama to The Cook Report and beyond, the channel has long been a supporter and platform for Hillsborough stories.

    “On a personal note, I thought their treatment of the Rhys Jones story, Little Boy Blue, was poignant and sensitive – we couldn’t be in better hands.”

    Polly Hill, ITV’s head of drama, said: “This drama is dedicated to Anne Williams and her diligent and tireless 23 year campaign to learn how and when her son died. She was an inspiration and I’m proud that we can depict her story.”
     
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  11. Niall

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  12. Niall

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  13. Ron1892

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    Hillsborough: No further criminal charges likely over disaster and aftermath

    No more former officers are likely to face criminal prosecutions in connection to the Hillsborough tragedy and its aftermath.

    The Crown Prosecution Service today confirmed it will not charge two ex-West Midlands Police officers, whose actions it was probing.

    It was also revealed evidence linked to three former South Yorkshire Police officers would not be passed to prosecutors for consideration.

    In a series of announcements this morning the CPS and police watchdog the Independent Office for Police Conduct (formerly the IPCC) revealed their latest findings linked to the investigation surrounding the 1989 tragedy and what followed.

    The CPS had been reviewing a West Midlands Police evidence file linked to two suspects that was referred to it by the IOPC earlier this year.

    West Midlands Police was the force called in to review the conduct of South Yorkshire Police officers following the disaster.

    The WMP officers faced allegations they “failed to investigate the cause of the Hillsborough disaster properly, either deliberately to assist South Yorkshire Police (SYP) or otherwise negligently, and/or that a misleading or incomplete file was submitted to the Director of Public Prosecutions in 1990”.

    However, the CPS has ruled that, while cause for concern was found in the actions of both suspects, there was not enough evidence to “reach the high threshold required to prove a criminal offence”.

    The CPS added:

    • There is evidence some aspects of the investigation were not carried out to a high standard but not none to show any deliberate plan or action by the suspects to hinder it.
    • There is difficulty in attributing responsibility for all of the failings to these suspects.
    • There is no evidence that, as alleged, one suspect intentionally provided an inappropriate selection of evidence to the DPP so that he did not have an accurate picture of the key evidence available.
    Sue Hemming, Head of Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division at the CPS, today said: “I appreciate that my decision will be disappointing to you, but I would like to reassure you that in reaching this conclusion, we have spent a significant amount of time reviewing and considering the evidence that was submitted to us.

    “As you know, the standard of evidence required for any criminal prosecution is high.”

    The CPS is not considering any other files in relation to Hillsborough.

    This morning, the IOPC also released details of its findings in relation to three ex-SYP officers who were considered to be suspects but whose cases had not yet been referred to the CPS.

    It was alleged they sought to deliberately mislead the Lord Justice Taylor inquiry, the contributions hearing and the original inquest proceedings.

    There was some indication that two of the three former officers may have committed a criminal offence but the CPS ruled it was appropriate to refer their cases because they had already rejected the possibility of bringing criminal charges based on evidence reviewed in 2016. It added that no further evidence or legal matters had since been identified that could "realistically alter that view".

    The body confirmed the cases were not being passed to the CPS - meaning the suspects will not be prosecuted.

    Strategic lead for Hillsborough, Rachel Cerfontyne said: “At the core of my decision not to refer these SYP officers for formal charging decisions is the CPS’s clear view that charges would not be brought and the risk that a referral could cause disruption to the forthcoming Hillsborough trials.

    “The evidence gathered by the investigation team has been wide ranging and thorough. I have reviewed it very carefully, as I know the CPS have done.

    “This will now be used to determine if any officer involved in Hillsborough would have had a case to answer for misconduct if they were still serving. These findings, along with underlying evidence, will be set out in full in the Hillsborough final investigation report.”

    The update comes nine months after charges were announced against five men following an extensive investigation sparked by the Hillsborough Independent Panel report, published in 2012.

    Those suspects, including former Merseyside Police Chief Constable Norman Bettison, were charged with offences relating to the disaster and its aftermath, which led to the deaths of 96 Liverpool FC fans at an FA Cup semi-final against Nottingham Forest.


    Charges were authorised against a sixth man, matchday commander David Duckenfield, but in order to prosecute him a legal order imposed after an attempted private prosecution has to be lifted.

    Discussions over the lifting of that order - which if granted would see Mr Duckenfield charged with 95 counts of manslaughter by gross negligence - are currently going through the courts.

    Laws in place at the time mean he could not be charged in connection with the 96th fan to die, Tony Bland, due to the length of time Mr Bland died after the tragedy.

    https://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/new...harges-14408892.amp?__twitter_impression=true
     
  14. redabbey

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    Thanks for sharing Niall. Still a hard watch, listening to the stories around that fateful day.
     
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  15. Niall

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    A sculpture created in memory of the 96 children, women and men who lost their lives at Hillsborough has today been unveiled in its new home at Liverpool John Lennon Airport.

    The Band of Life, which was commissioned for the 25th anniversary of the disaster in 2014, has been relocated from its previous location in the atrium in the Liverpool Echo building on Old Hall Street.

    The monument is a simple band representing the bond between the families, friends, survivors and fans who were brought together by love for those lost in the tragedy.

    The band is a link between them, representing a continuous circle of love bringing the city of Liverpool together to remember. It has 96 lights, each representing a person who died, with the illumination symbolising a commitment to continue to bring light to their life.

    A special ceremony was held at JLA on Thursday to unveil the Band of Life in its new location, attended by the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, Cllr Malcolm Kennedy, representatives of the families, senior airport managers and Ian Rush.

    [​IMG]

    Hillsborough Family Support Group chair, Margaret Aspinall, said: "The Band of Life is hugely symbolic, not just to those who died and the families who've lost loved ones, but also the survivors and those who've supported us for so many years.

    "I've wanted it to go somewhere that it would be seen by many, many people and Liverpool John Lennon Airport is an excellent location given the large number of people who pass through their doors every year."

    The Lord Mayor added: "I am pleased and privileged to have unveiled the Band of Life at Liverpool John Lennon Airport.

    "It is a poignant symbol of the 96 innocent football fans that needlessly lost their lives, and a constant reminder of the long fight for truth and justice by their families."

    Mayor of Liverpool, Joe Anderson, said: "The Band of Life's new home at Liverpool John Lennon Airport will mean it will be seen by millions of people every year, which is really important as we are committed to forever remembering the 96 lives that were lost.

    "It will give people the opportunity to reflect not just on those who died, but also the incredible bravery of their families."

    Robert Hough, chairman of Liverpool John Lennon Airport, commented: "When we heard that a new home was being sought for the Band of Life, we were naturally only too happy to offer space for this to be relocated close to the arrivals area in the airport terminal building.

    "This will help to ensure that the millions of arriving passengers at the airport, be they visitors to the city region or those returning home, will continue to remember the 96 lives that were lost."
     
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  16. honald_tdb

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  17. Niall

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  18. honald_tdb

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    Sorry that's what I tried to post. It's vile.
     
  19. Niall

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    Liverpool Football Club will mark the 29th anniversary of the Hillsborough tragedy with tributes across the weekend and a day of themed programming on LFCTV.

    At the request of the majority of families, a minute’s applause will be held before kick-off in Saturday’s match against Bournemouth at Anfield to celebrate the 96 children, women and men who lost their lives as a result of the events on April 15, 1989, and recognise the achievements of the families, survivors, fans and all those who have supported the long campaign for justice.

    Fans on the Kop will reveal a special ‘96’ mosaic and players will wear black armbands as a mark of respect. Tributes will be displayed on LED boards surrounding the pitch and there will also be a commemorative edition of the matchday programme.

    On Sunday April 15, players and staff across the club will fall silent at 3.06pm to observe a minute’s silence in memory of the 96.

    LFCTV will feature a day of themed programming and will be free to air in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and worldwide online on LFCTV GO.

    LFCTV channel schedule – Sunday April 15

    • 10.15am: More Than a Number – part one
    • 12.45pm: More Than a Number – part two
    • 3pm: Period of reflection
    • 3.30pm: More Than a Number – part three
    • 6.30pm: More Than a Number - part four
    • 8pm: More Than a Number – part five
    • 10pm: Hillsborough Timeline
    • 11.15pm: Hillsborough Inquests – Story of the Day
    • 11.45pm: Never Forgotten
    Click here for more information.

    The Anfield retail superstore will be closed from 1pm and club stores in Liverpool One, Birkenhead, Chester, Dublin and Belfast will also cease trading temporarily to observe the minute of silence.

    To mark the 30th anniversary next year, the club will host a special Hillsborough memorial service at Anfield at the request of the Hillsborough Family Support Group. Details regarding the memorial service will be released in early 2019.
     
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  20. LKDAVE

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    Phil Scraton


    It was an honour to be asked to write a piece for yesterday's match programme Anfield Review - 14 April 2018 - Liverpool v Bournemouth - and to be on the Kop with Jim Sharman with the iconic banner 'We Climbed The Hill in Our Own Way'.

    Today we'll be at Anfield at 3pm to remember the 96. What follows is the brief article published in the programme and a couple of photos.

    Justice for the 96. Phil, Deena, Paul and Sean and families xxx

    15 April 1989

    'When the fixtures were published yesterday’s game was the first I looked for. Bournemouth at home - just hours before the Hillsborough anniversary. It was a privilege to be on the Kop, holding the banner.

    Although a lifelong Reds fan the anniversary isn't about football. It is about honouring the memory of the 96 and all who have died prematurely as a direct consequence of the physical and psychological damage suffered through their bereavement or survival.

    Jürgen Klopp has said April 15th is significant for all football, not limited to the Club. Of course, like Munich, he’s right. But it goes beyond the game, beyond sport, beyond our City.

    The anniversary is a profound reminder of the inquest jury's 2016 verdict that those who died were killed unlawfully, that multiple institutional failures caused the disaster and, crucially, that our fans - themselves survivors - were in no way responsible.

    Yet those who survived always knew precisely what happened. The late Eddie Spearritt, my great friend, lost consciousness with his dying son, Adam, in his arms. Like so many survivors' accounts of the appalling condition of the Leppings Lane end, its bottleneck outside, its steep tunnel inside and its inescapable pens, Eddie knew the truth: 'Because I was there'.

    On this day together we honour that truth and respect the memory of all who died then and since. Last year the memorial service moved from Anfield. It was a decision by the Hillsborough Family Support Group, reflecting the immense weight of responsibility they have carried with great dignity down the years, while for each and every family member, close friend and survivor the painful burden of personal loss persists.

    As in 2017, families and survivors will be at different venues, the memorials, the Metropolitan Cathedral, by gravesides of loved ones. I will be with my family at the Anfield Memorial. Wherever, we are together.

    I have known many families and survivors since 1989.Those who were children at the time now have children themselves. Humility, persistence, courage, fearlessness, tenacity - these are their qualities, now universally respected.

    Throughout the 2000s their struggle, our struggle, for justice seemed unwinnable. To all appearances it was a 'fallow decade' as if the end of the road had been reached. Families and survivors were told continually to 'move on'.

    Yet they never backed down, they - you - organised and campaigned. It was sure knowledge of 'the truth' in the face of persistent, institutional denial that kept them going. And our fans never stopped chanting ‘Justice for the 96’.

    Yesterday was the game and it’s been wonderful watching our team playing open, one-touch football. The 'buzz' around the club is exciting. But our lasting tribute to those who died at Hillsborough, the families and survivors is to retain perspective - football is football, no more no less. None of us walk alone.'
     
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